WHY HUNGER AND HOMELESSNESS?..

Poverty doesn't have a certain face.

The problem of hunger and homelessness

Hunger and homelessness is the world’s biggest health problem – 870 million people do not have enough to eat and 98% of them live in developing countries. Sister 2 Sister Inc. believes that no one should have to live with hunger, toxic food and water, and the damage it does to your body. Sister 2 Sister Inc. knows hunger affects everything for the world’s poorest people. We believe no one should have to live with hunger and the damage it does. That is why Sister 2 Sister Inc. is working for a world in which no one dies for want of safe, quality, nutritious food. Hunger forces people to make tough choices that push them further into poverty: parents take their children out of school to work; families eat seeds that should be preserved for the next harvest. Lack of food also jeopardizes the well-being of families: mothers are forced to reduce the number of meals children eat; families replace nutritious foods like vegetables and beans.

Our Role

Sister 2 Sister Inc. strives to tackle hunger locally then within the most vulnerable people in the world’s poorest places. For more than 12 years, Sister 2 Sister Inc. has been giving back to the through volunteer work and several shelters and masjids. 

Long-term effects

The long-term effects of hunger and homelessness go beyond health. Homelessness age women much faster by 10 years. Poor nutrition leads to poor performance in school and fewer opportunities. Children’s brains will not fully develop and their bodies will be stunted. This has a devastating and harmful effect on families, communities and countries. Malnutrition increases disease by weakening the immune system, making it vulnerable to the effects of diarrhoea, tuberculosis, malaria, HIV and AIDS.

Hunger is not an incurable disease or an unavoidable tragedy. We can make sure no child goes without food. We can stop mothers from starving themselves to feed their families. We can save lives. We can do all of this, if we are prepared to do something about it.

Donate Today and be a blessing to 489 homeless sister's and families in need.

Homeless woman,  hands a lighter to her boyfriend while they stand at the temporary location they call ‘home’, under a bridge on Piet Retief street, ch, South Africa. Homeless people in Stellenbosch face the daily threat of having their belongings confiscated or being forcibly removed from these areas by the police.

"The park is part of city property so you aren't allowed to food share," the officer in the video said. “...If you guys continue to food share, then you guys are subject to arrest, all right?" Everyone who was handing out food, including a 14-year-old, was arrested, given a misdemeanor citation with a date to appear in court and released. No one was taken away in handcuffs"

According to the civil rights movement, the food-aid agency for the country’s 1-million homeless.  Hundreds of people being evicted from camps along the Santa Ana River into motels and eventually into three temporary shelters in Huntington Beach, Irvine and Laguna Niguel, marking the county's most concrete effort yet to find housing for the unsheltered.

 

Documents obtained by Fairfax Media through freedom-of-information laws detail more than 200 telephone and email complaints made to Melbourne City Council about homelessness in the 15-month period to April this year.

Lovenia Evans, who is pregnant, smokes a cigarette by her tent between the Watergate and Whitehurst Freeway in Washington, D.C. on November 16, 2015. “This is my second week in this tent, it's better to be here than laying on the street or sidewalk. I'm pregnant and they would like to me to come off the street,” 

Deja-Lynn Rombawa-Quarles, a 24-year-old woman who works part time at an elementary school as a group leader, sits in her tent at a homeless encampment in the Kakaako district of Honolulu on August 26, 2015. Rombawa-Quarles is one of a growing number of working poor in Honolulu who, through a combination of high housing costs, a dearth of affordable housing, and bad circumstances, wound up living on the street.